Curriculum vitae

Faculty page – Agnes Scott College English Department

rmeyerlee@agnesscott.edu

 


 

INSTITUTIONS

 

Permanent appointments

Agnes Scott College, Margaret W. Pepperdene Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence, 2016-2018; Associate Professor, 2018-present

Indiana University South Bend, Assistant Professor, 2008-2011; Associate Professor, 2011-2016

Goshen College, Assistant Professor, 2004-2008

Rhodes College, Assistant Professor, 2001-2003

 

Visiting appointments

Agnes Scott College, Dabney Adams Hart Distinguished Visiting Humanities Professor, 2015-2016

University of Notre Dame, Department of English, Visiting Assistant Professor, spring 2005

University of Notre Dame, Medieval Institute, Visiting Scholar, 2002-2017

 

Editorial positions

Co-Editor, Journal for English and Germanic Philology, September 2015-present

Editorial Board, Chaucer Studies series, Boydell and Brewer, October 2011-present

Editorial Board, The Chaucer Review, March 2010-present

Advisory Board, Journal for English and Germanic Philology, 2014-2015

 

Education

Yale University, PhD. in English language and literature, 2001

New York University, M.A. in English and American literature, 1992

Williams College, B.A. magna cum laude in computer science, 1986

 


PUBLICATIONS

 

Monograph

Poets and Power from Chaucer to Wyatt. Cambridge University Press, 2007; paperback edition, 2009, pp. xi + 297

 

Edited collection of essays

The Medieval Literary: Beyond Form, edited with Catherine Sanok. Boydell and Brewer, 2018, pp. xii + 276

 

Articles and chapters

“The First Chaucerians: Reception in the 1400s.” In Geoffrey Chaucer in Context, ed. Ian Johnson, Cambridge University Press, forthcoming, 12 pages in typescript

“Introduction: The Literary through—or beyond?—Form.” With Catherine Sanok. In The Medieval Literary: Beyond Form, ed. Robert J. Meyer-Lee and Catherine Sanok, Boydell and Brewer, 2018, pp. 1-12

“The Memorial Form of John Lydgate’s Troy Book.Exemplaria 29.4, Fall 2017, pp. 280-95

“Toward a Theory and Practice of Literary Valuing.” New Literary History 46.2, Spring 2015, pp. 335-55

“Literary Value and the Customs House:   The Axiological Logic of Chaucer’s House of Fame.” The Chaucer Review 48.4, April 2014, pp. 374-94

“The Problem of Tale Order.” In Approaches to Teaching Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, 2nd ed., ed. Peter Travis and Frank Grady, The Modern Language Association, 2014, pp. 67-72

“In Praise of Power: Prince and Poet in Fifteenth-Century Court Poetry.” In The Blackwell Companion to British Literature, ed. Heesok Chang, Robert DeMaria Jr., and Samantha Zacher, Blackwell, 2014, pp. 369-83

“Abandon the Fragments.” Studies in the Age of Chaucer 35, 2013, pp. 47-83

“John Lydgate’s Major Poems.” In A Companion to Fifteenth-Century Poetry, ed. Julia Boffey and A. S. G. Edwards, D. S. Brewer, 2013, pp. 59-71

“Conception Is a Blessing: Marian Devotion, Heresy, and the Literary in Skelton’s A Replycacion.” In Form and Reform: Reading Across the Fifteenth Century, ed. Shannon Gayk and Kathleen Tonry, The Ohio State University Press, 2011, pp. 133-58

“Fragments IV and V of the Canterbury Tales Do Not Exist.” The Chaucer Review 45.1, July 2010, pp. 1-31

“The Emergence of the Literary in John Lydgate’s Life of Our Lady.” Journal of English and Germanic Philology 109.3, July 2010, pp. 322-48

“The Vatic Penitent: John Audelay’s Self-Representation.” In My Wyl and My Wrytyng: Essays on John the Blind Audelay, ed. Susanna Fein, Medieval Institute Publications, 2009, pp. 54-85

“Manuscript Studies, Literary Value, and the Object of Chaucer Studies.” Studies in the Age of Chaucer 30, 2008, pp. 1-37

“A Defense of Ornament: The Supplement of Literary Language and Julia Spicher Kasdorf’s ‘Catholics’ and ‘Mennonites.’” Mennonite Quarterly Review 82.2, January 2008, pp. 43-63

“Lydgate’s Laureate Pose.” In John Lydgate: Poetry, Culture, and Lancastrian England, ed. Larry Scanlon and James Simpson, University of Notre Dame Press, 2006, pp. 36-60

“Laureates and Beggars in Fifteenth-Century English Poetry: The Case of George Ashby.” Speculum 79.3, July 2004, pp. 688-726

“Hoccleve and the Apprehension of Money.” Exemplaria 13.1, 2001 (winner of the 2003 Medieval Academy Van Courtlandt Elliott Prize), pp. 173-214

“The Allure of the Phantom Popet.” The Chaucer Newsletter 22.2, 2000 (winner of the 2000 New Chaucer Society Congress essay contest), p. 6

 

Annotated bibliography

 “John Lydgate.” In Oxford Bibliographies in Medieval Studies. Ed. Paul E. Szarmach. New York: Oxford University Press, 30 September 2014. http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780195396584/obo-9780195396584-0164.xml?rskey=1HuHsk&result=88

 

Book reviews

David Aers, Beyond Reformation: An Essay on William Langland’s Piers Plowman and the End of Constantinian Christianity. Mennonite Quarterly Review, forthcoming, 5 pages in typescript

Danila Sokolov, Renaissance Texts, Medieval Subjectivities: Rethinking Petrarchan Desire from Wyatt to Shakespeare. Speculum 93.3, 2018, pp. 912-14

Warren Ginsberg, Tellers, Tales, and Translation in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. The Medieval Review, https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/tmr/article/view/22777/28665, 2016, 2463 words

Anne Middleton, Chaucer, Langland, and Fourteenth-Century Literary History. The Yearbook of Langland Studies 29, 2015, pp. 198-204

Mary C. Flannery, John Lydgate and the Poetics of Fame. Journal of English and Germanic Philology 113.2, 2014, pp. 253-55

Medieval and Early Modern Authorship, ed. Guillemette Bolens and Lukas Erne, and Author, Reader, Book: Medieval Authorship in Theory and Practice, ed. Stephen Partridge and Erik Kwakkel. Studies in the Age of Chaucer 35, 2013, pp. 387-93

Tison Pugh, An Introduction to Geoffrey Chaucer. The Medieval Review, https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/handle/2022/3631, 2013, 1648 words

Antony J. Hasler, Court Poetry in Late Medieval England and Scotland: Allegories of Authority. Speculum 87.4, 2012, pp. 52-54

J. A. Burrow, The Poetry of Praise. Comparative Literature Studies 48.4, 2011, pp. 603-6

Jenni Nuttall, The Creation of Lancastrian Kingship. Studies in the Age of Chaucer 31, 2009, pp. 359-63

Samantha J. Rayner, Images of Kingship in Chaucer and his Ricardian Contemporaries. The Medieval Review, https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/handle/2022/3631, 2009, 1873 words

Isabel Davis, Writing Masculinity in the Later Middle Ages. Speculum 83.4, 2008, pp. 975-77

Lisa H. Cooper and Andrea Denny-Brown, eds., Lydgate Matters. The Medieval Review, https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/handle/2022/3631, 2008, 1946 words

Nigel Mortimer, John Lydgate’s “Fall of Princes”: Narrative Tragedy in its Literary and Political Contexts. Journal of English and Germanic Philology 107.1, 2008, pp. 135-8

Katherine C. Little, Confession and Resistance: Defining the Self in Late Medieval England. Studies in the Age of Chaucer 29, 2007, pp. 514-17

Paul Strohm, Politique: Languages of Statecraft between Chaucer and Shakespeare. Modern Philology 104.4, 2007, pp. 570-4

Thomas Hoccleve, “My Compleinte” and Other Poems, ed. Roger Ellis, and Thomas Hoccleve: A Facsimile of the Autograph Manuscripts, ed. J. A. Burrow and A. I. Doyle. Journal of English and Germanic Philology 104.3, 2005, pp. 404-9

Katherine Kern, Where Such Unmaking Reigns. Mennonite Quarterly Review 79.3, 2005

Ethan Knapp, The Bureaucratic Muse: Thomas Hoccleve and the Literature of Late Medieval England. Archiv fur das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen 241.2, 2004, pp. 402-4

The Long Fifteenth Century: Essays for Douglas Gray, ed. Helen Cooper and Sally Mapstone. Journal of English and Germanic Philology 101.4, 2002, pp. 571-3

 

Work in progress

Literary Value and Social Identity in the Canterbury Tales – monograph under contract with Cambridge University Press

The Problem of Literary Value: In Chaucer Studies and Beyond – monograph project in process

 


PRESENTATIONS

Invited talks

“Chaucer and Literary Value: Clerk, Merchant, Squire, Franklin.” Therese Kayser Lindsey Literary Series, Texas State University, 29 March 2018

“The Politics of Poetry: Or, What a Medieval Bureaucrat and Monk Have to Do with Robert Frost, Vietnam, Maya Angelou, and Richard Blanco.” Dabney Adams Hart Distinguished Humanities Lecture, Agnes Scott College, 9 October 2017

“The Ghosts of Canons Past, Present, and Future: The Problem of Literary Value and a Modest Proposal for Out-Flanking It.” A.C.M.E. Lecture, Agnes Scott College, 20 October 2016

“Putting Fragments IV and V Back Together.” National Endowment of the Humanities Canterbury Tales Summer Seminar, Kent, Ohio, 26 July 2016

“Sailing on the Roiling and Murky Waters of Literary Value.” Indiana University South Bend Dean’s Seminar, 16 November 2012

“Representing Chaucer: History, Value, and the Chaucer Edition.” University of Illinois Program in Medieval Studies, 29 October 2009

“What Did Chaucer Really Write?” Maple Scholars Research Banquet, Goshen College, 30 July 2009

“Laureates and Beggars: Poetry and Political Power.” Goshen College Convocation, 26 March 2007

 

Conference papers

“Loving and Hating Canonicity.” The New Chaucer Society International Congress, Toronto, 11 July 2018

“Chaucer, Petrarch, and the ‘Clerk of Oxenford.’” The Medieval Academy of America Annual Meeting, Atlanta, 1 March 2018

“Who Tells the Merchant’s Tale?” The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 12 May 2017

“Valuing Chaucer.” The New Chaucer Society International Congress, London, 11 July 2016

“Merchant-Squire: Love, Fiction, and Literary Value.” The New Chaucer Society International Congress, Reykjavik, 18 July 2014

“What Hoccleve’s Series Tells Us about the Canterbury Tales.” The Canada Chaucer Seminar, Toronto, 12 April 2014

“Lydgate and Vietnam.” The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 9 May 2013

“The Edition as Reification of Literary Value.” The New Chaucer Society International Congress, Portland, 26 July 2012

“Performance Studies and the manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales.” The New Chaucer Society International Congress, Siena, 19 July 2010

“Why Fragments IV and V of the Canterbury Tales Do Not Exist and How This Matters.” The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 8 May 2009

“Ambiguous Evidence, Interpretation, and the Canterbury Tales ‘Occupation Group.’” The International Conference on Middle English, Cambridge, 26 July 2008

“The Devotional Literary: Lydgate’s Life of Our Lady.” The New Chaucer Society International Congress, Swansea, 18 July 2008

“The Value of Chaucer.” The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 10 May 2008

“John the Blind Audelay: Politics and Trauma in Bodleian Library MS Douce 302.” The MLA Convention, Chicago, 27 December 2007

“Loke in this book”: John Audelay’s Langlandian Bibliobiography.” The International Piers Plowman Conference, Philadelphia, 19 May 2007

“Conception Is a Blessing: Marian Devotion, Heresy, and the Literary in Lydgate’s Life of Our Lady and Skelton’s A Replycacion.” The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 11 May 2007

“A Defense of Ornament: Poetic language, the Female Body, and the Poetry of Julia Spicher Kasdorf.” Mennonite/s Writing Conference: Beyond Borders, 28 October 2006

“‘Yes, Virginia, there really is a Canterbury Tales’: An Apologia for New Critical Historicism.” The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 4 May 2006

“The Vatic Penitent:   John Audelay’s Self-Representation.” The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 5 May 2005

“Christine de Pizan and the Beginning of the English Poetic Tradition.” The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 9 May 2004

“The Name of the Author (or the Lack Thereof) in Fifteenth-Century English Poetry: ‘A Reproof to Lydgate.’” The MLA Convention, San Diego, 28 December 2003

“Laureate Failures: Power and Selfhood in the Poetry of Hawes, Barclay, and Skelton.” The International Medieval Congress, Leeds, U. K., 17 July 2003

“The Poet in the Poem: The Case of Alexander Barclay.” The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 11 May 2003

“Wordsworth’s Affective Piety.” The New Chaucer Society International Congress, Boulder, 20 July 2002

“Walking Backward: English Literary History and the Prologues of Stephen Hawes.” The Sewanee Mediaeval Colloquium, The University of the South, 13 April 2002

“The Monk of Bury: How and Why Lydgate Textualizes His Monastic Identity.” The MLA Convention, New Orleans, 30 December 2001

“Authorial Self-Naming in English Poetry, c. 800 – 1523.” The MLA Convention, Washington, 29 December 2000

“The ‘I’ of Laureate Lydgate.” The New Chaucer Society International Congress, London, 14 July 2000

“Lydgate’s Lyric Ego.” The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 9 May 1999

“A Reconsideration of the Anglo-Saxon Widsith: About Time.” The Medieval Studies Graduate Student Conference, Yale University, 17 April 1999

“Hoccleve, Money, and the Series.” The Arizona Center for Medieval Studies Conference, Tempe, 14 February 1998

“Wolfgang Iser and Chaucer: The Pros and Cons.” The Medieval Studies Graduate Colloquium, Yale University, 30 March 1996

 

Invited papers, seminars, and lectures

Response to “Hoccleve, Lydgate, and Their Patrons” paper session. The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 11 May 2018

“The Squire’s Tale.” Invited class lecture, Texas State University, 29 March 2018

“Squire-Franklin.” Invited seminar, National Endowment of the Humanities Canterbury Tales Summer Seminar, Kent, Ohio, 27 July 2016

Troy Book Misbehaving.” Invited paper, The Huntington Library, for the conference “The Provocative Fifteenth Century,” 16 October 2015.

Response to “The Decadent Fifteenth Century” paper session. The International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 15 May 2015

“What the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Tells Us about Form and the Literary in Lydgate’s Troy Book.” Contributed presentation, Yale University, for the research seminar “Form and the Literary in the Middle Ages,” 7 November 2014

“Fragments? What Fragments?” Invited paper, University of Notre Dame London Facility, for the conference “New Directions in Medieval Manuscript Studies and Reading Practices,” 21 October 2011

“Criseyde’s Precursor: Dido, Emotion, and the Literary in the House of Fame.” Invited paper, Freie Universität Berlin, for the conference “Performing the Poetics of Passion: Troilus & Cressida / Troilus & Criseyde,” 14 May 2010

“The Axiological Logic of Chaucer’s House of Fame.” Invited seminar, University of Illinois Program in Medieval Studies, 30 October 2009

“The Prologues of Stephen Hawes.” Invited paper, The Yale Medieval Studies Colloquium, Yale University, 11 April 2001

“The Real Poet: Authorial Self-Representation between Chaucer and Wyatt.” The Yale Medieval Studies Colloquium, Yale University, 5 April 2000

“Aureate—and Laureate—Lydgate.” The Yale Medieval-Renaissance Colloquium, Yale University, 2 December 1999

 

 

 


 

Professional Leadership and Service

Co-Chair, New Chaucer Society 2018 Congress Program Committee, 2016-2018

Van Courtlandt Elliott Prize Committee, The Medieval Academy of America, 2016-present (Chair, 2018-19)

Nominating Committee, The New Chauce18r Society, December 2015-2017

Program Committee and Program Committee Working Group, Medieval Academy of America 2015 Annual Meeting, 2013-2015

Evaluator of book and article submissions for Manchester University Press, University of Exeter Press, Boydell & Brewer, Palgrave Macmillan, Studies in the Age of Chaucer, Exemplaria, The Chaucer Review, Viator, Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Journal of Medieval Religious Culture, Literature Compass, Modern Philology, New Literary History, Mennonite Quarterly Review

Session organizer for The New Chaucer Society International Congress: “The Squire and His Tale:  ‘Ernest’ or ‘Game’?,” 2018; “Literary Value in 2016,” 2016; “The Teller and the Tale: Life Writing and The Canterbury Tales,” 2014; “Functions of the Chaucer Edition,” 2012; “From Crux to Theory,” 2006

Session organizer for the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo: “The Language of Race in Medieval English Literature,” 2018 (with Renée Trilling); “Reconsidering Form and the Literary,” 2015 (with Catherine Sanok); “Hoccleve,” 2002; “The Idea of the Author in Fifteenth-Century English Literature,” 2001; and “Counsel and Counselors in Late Medieval English Writing,” 2001

Session organizer for Medieval Academy of America Annual Meeting, “The New Philology at Twenty-Five,” 2015; “The Literary beyond Form,” 2014 (with Catherine Sanok)

Session organizer for the MLA Convention: “Saintly Women and Priestly Poets: The Fifteenth-Century English Poetry of Osbern Bokenham, John Capgrave, and John Audelay,” 2007; “Fifteenth-Century Literary Transgressions,” 2001; “Lydgate’s Aureate Style: Reassessing Its Literary and Historical Implications,” 1999

Co-organizer, with Catherine Sanok and Jessica Brantley, for “Form and the Literary in the Middle Ages,” a research seminar held at Yale University and sponsored by the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale Medieval Studies, and Yale English, 2014

Invited presenter for a panel discussion for English graduate students on the variety of faculty careers, University of Notre Dame, 14 November 2013

Invited presenter for “Small College Teaching” panel discussion, University of Notre Dame, 26 September 2007

Author of invited reflection piece, “Catholics, Mennonites, and Women: Julia Spicher Kasdorf and the Dreaded Humanities Survey,” Journal of the Center for Mennonite Writing 8.1, January 2016, http://www.mennonitewriting.org/journal/8/1/catholics-mennonites-and-women-julia-spicher-kasdo/#all

Advisory Board, Center for Mennonite Writing, January 2009-present


COURSES

 

Agnes Scott College

Chaucer, Gender, and Sexuality

History of the English Language

Arthurian Literature and Film

The Human and the Divine in Ancient and Medieval World Literature

Leadership and Gender in the Young Adult Fantasy Novel

 

Indiana University South Bend

Professional Literary Scholarship (graduate methods course with Chaucer as primary text)

Stylistics (graduate course)

Senior Seminar: Late Medieval British Pseudo-Autobiographical Writing

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales

Literatures in English to 1600

History of the English Language (combined graduate/undergraduate course)

World Literary and Intellectual Traditions: Heroes in Ancient and Medieval World Literature

Literary and Intellectual Traditions: Imagining King Arthur

Elementary Composition

MA thesis director for two students

MA thesis committee member for eight students

 

University of Notre Dame

Ricardian Poetry (graduate course)

 

Goshen College

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales

Arthurian Literature and Film

British Literature to 1800

Critical Theory and Practice

Literature and Music (co-taught with Matthew Hill)

Introduction to Literature

Literature and Writing

 

Rhodes College

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales

Medieval English Autobiographical Writing

Arthurian Literature

Survey of British Literature I

Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing

 

Yale University

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (as assistant)

Shakespeare’s Histories and Tragedies (as assistant)

Milton (as assistant)

Problems in Cultural Criticism (postcolonial theory and literature; as assistant)

The European Literary Tradition (the epic from Homer to Joyce; as assistant)

Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking (as instructor)

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